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Project Management Blog
Sunday, 15 July 2007 13:13

35 Contact Hours

In order to apply for the PMP® Exam you will have to evidence "35 contact hours of formal education". The PMI explains this as follows in the PMP® Credentials Handbook :

"Verify at least 35 contact hours of specific instruction that addresses learning objectives in project management. Document all project management education hours, regardless of when they were accrued. The course work must be completed at the time of application. The course hours may include content on project quality, scope, time, cost, human resources, communications, risk, procurement and integration management."

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Thursday, 29 March 2007 09:48

Band-Aids and Merry-go-Rounds

As I child I had a lot of experience with both of these.  I assume everyone is familiar with band-aids, the merry-go-round I’m referring to is the kind you find on a playground.  These are basically a large dish parallel to the ground mounted on a central axis with some handle bars to hold on to - here is a picture of one.  Aside from a trip down memory lane, what do these two things have to do with managing a PMO or even project management or even work?   I’m glad you asked – both of these items and their lessons from childhood give us insight into change.  First, I want to look at each type of change and then talk about which is better (or not)?  
Published in Blogs
Tuesday, 27 March 2007 08:43

Calling All Team Members

One week after the very bumpy implementation of the new sales management system, all implementation team members were invited to a lessons learned session. In the invitation from the Director of Project Management was an assurance that the purpose of the meeting was truly to capture lessons learned for future implementations. In spite of this, most attendees were apprehensive.

Published in Blogs
Friday, 23 February 2007 08:49

PMP VS. Masters Degree

Original Question: One of my friends is going for masters in project management from University of Calgary, Canada. Even though, the reputation of university is first-rate as it is one of the top universities in North America for Project Management. However, UofC is not among the accredited schools of PM from PMI perspective. What is your opinion about non-accredited schools of PMI? In addition, how do you see the graduates from UofC getting jobs in Canada & around the world?

I would appreciate your valuable advice.
Cheers
Naseem

Published in Blogs
Sunday, 18 February 2007 19:31

9 Benefits of a Project Schedule

The Value of a Project Schedule: "Failing to plan means planning to fail".In my mind, that sums it up.  But this article will focus on providing some more detailed benefits.Contrary to what you might be thinking, this article is NOT some type of promotion for the use of Microsoft Project.  As a matter of fact, your schedule could be developed on a napkin, providing you (and your team) develop it, and manage with it!!
Published in Blogs
Monday, 05 February 2007 17:14

Tips for taking the PMP exam

THE APPLICATION PROCESS
  1. Join PMI. It's about $150 between the national and local chapters. Then you get a $100 discount on the exam which is normally $550, I think.
  2. Get 35 PDUs, or be sure you complete the PDUs before you take the exam.
  3. Fill out the online app. It will break down all of your PM experience into about 50 different areas. Have your referenes updated contact info. PMI does a random audit of applicants, so fill out the info as best you can.
  4. PMI responds that your application has been accepted in about a week.
  5. Only then can you schedule an exam date.
  6. Pass the exam.
  7. Status is good for 3 years. To main status, you need to earn 60 PDU's over the 3 years. Then pay again to renew status. You don't need to take the test again.
Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 20:39

Project Cost

What is a Project Cost? Each resource in the project must be accounted for and assigned to a cost category. Categories include the following:

  • Labor costs
  • Material costs
  • Travel costs
  • Supplies
  • Hardware costs
  • Software costs
  • Special categories (inflation, cost reserve, and so on)

 

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 17:37

Project Management Plan

The project plan is a key integrative document that uses the outputs of the other planning processes to create a consistent, coherent document that is the guide to both project execution and project control. Be familiar with what the project plan is used for and what items are often included in a project plan. The PM uses it to guide project execution, to document our planning assumptions, to document planning decisions regarding some of the alternatives that we have chosen. We use it to facilitate communication among the stakeholders and define key management reviews as to content, expense, and timing. It is a baseline for progress measurement and project control.

The project management plan can be either summary level or detailed, and can be composed of one or more subsidiary plans and other components. Each of the subsidiary plans and components is detailed to the extent required by the specific project.

The Develop Project Management Plan process includes the actions necessary to define, integrate, and coordinate all subsidiary plans into a project management plan. The project management plan content will vary depending upon the application area and complexity of the project. This process results in a project management plan that is updated and revised through the Integrated Change Control process. It also defines how the project is executed, monitored and controlled, and closed. The purpose of planning is to develop a Project Plan.


Subsidiary plans

  • Project scope management plan
  • Schedule management plan
  • Cost management plan
  • Quality management plan
  • Process improvement plan
  • Staffing management plan
  • Communication management plan
  • Risk management plan
  • Procurement management plan

Other key components include, but are not limited to:

  • Milestone list
  • Resource calendar
  • Schedule baseline
  • Cost baseline
  • Quality baseline
  • Risk register
Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 14:58

Project Management Defined

The PMBOK®Guide defines project management as “ . . . the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements”. Although this definition may sound pretty straightforward, you will find that the skillful application of those skills, tools, and techniques will come only after you’ve had a significant amount of education and on-the-job experience.

Managing a Project includes Identifying requirements, establishing clear and achievable objectives, balancing the competing demands for quality, scope, time and cost and adapting to the different expectations of the various stakeholders.

Problems, needs, and opportunities continually arise in every organization. Problems like low operational efficiency, needs like additional office space, and opportunities like penetrating a new product market are just a few of a nearly endless number of situations that management must address in the process of operating an organization or company. These problems, needs, and opportunities give rise to the identification of solutions. Executing those solutions entails a change for the organization. Projects are generally established to carry out this change and there’s always someone responsible for the successful completion of each project. As the project manager, you are the primary change agent, and your guide for carrying out the change is the project management process.

 

PROJECT TOOLS

     A. Unique to the project
          a. Work Breakdown Structures
          b. Critical Path Analysis
          c. Earned Value Management

     B. Multiple applications
          a. PMBOK
          b. Standards and Regulations
          c. General Management skills
          d. Interpersonal skills


PROJECT WORK VS. OPERATIONAL WORK
For the exam you should know the similarities and differences between Project Work and Operational Work.

1. Similarities
      A. Performed by People
      B. Constrained by limited resources
      C. Planned, Executed and Controlled

2. Differences
      A. Projects end while operations are ongoing
      B. Objectives are fundamentally different
      C. Projects attain an objective and then terminate.
      D. Projects are bound by multiple constraints


The project manager is a professional who has a responsibility to have a good education, a good understanding of the practice, and experience in the respective field. The PM will play a series of roles: project manager, integrator, communicator, team leader, decision maker, etc...

 

 

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