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Project Management Blog
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Thursday, 25 January 2007 18:17

Project Scope

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Project scope management, according to the PMBOK, constitutes 'the processes to ensure that the project includes all of the work required, and only the work required, to complete the project successfully.' Project scope management has several purposes: 

Last modified on Friday, 11 December 2009 00:43
Thursday, 25 January 2007 17:56

Closing a Project

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In multi-phase projects, the Close Project process closes out the portion of the project scope and associated activities applicable to a given phase. The two procedures necessary to perform the closure activities across the entire project or for a project phase:

Last modified on Thursday, 10 December 2009 18:51
Thursday, 25 January 2007 17:50

Integrated Change Control

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The purpose of overall change control is to influence factors that create change so the change is beneficial, determine when a change has occurred, and manage actual changes when they do occur. This process is concerned with coordinating changes across the entire project. Performed from project Inception through Completion. A Change Control System is used to evaluate and approve or kickback change requests for the project. Changes requests stem from suggestions of the stakeholders. The PM must be careful; certain changes may lead to additional Time and Cost. The PM uses Integrated Change Control to:

Last modified on Friday, 11 December 2009 02:37
Thursday, 25 January 2007 17:41

Configuration Management

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Configuration management is the term given to the identification, tracking and managing of all the assets of a project; it focuses on controlling the characteristics of a product or service (also referred to as deliverables). In a general sense, configuration management consists of the following:

 

  • The documentation of the features, characteristics, and functions of a product or service
  • The applied control to restrict changes to the features, characteristics, and function of the product or service
  • The process of documenting any changes to the product or service
  • The ongoing auditing of products and services to ensure their conformance to documented requirements
  • Establishes a method to consistently identify and request changes to established baselines
  • To assess the value and effectiveness of changes
  • Provides opportunities to continuously validate and improve the project by considering the impact of each change
  • Provides the mechanism for the project management team to consistently communicate all changes to the stakeholders.

 

Configuration management activities included in the integrated change control process are:

  • Configuration Identification - Providing the basis from which the configuration of products is defined and verified, products and documents are labeled, changes are managed, and accountability is maintained.
  • Configuration Status Accounting - Capturing, storing, and accessing configuration information needed to manage products and product information effectively.
  • Configuration Verification and Auditing - Establishing that the performance and functional requirements defined in the configuration documentation have been met.

When it comes to configuration management, think paperwork. Think about all the paperwork that is involved in documenting every single component of a system deliverable and making sure that there are no changes to that deliverable, or if there are changes, that they are thoroughly documented. Configuration management is traceable. For the exam, know that all change must be screened, tracked, accepted, approved, and the development process updated thereafter.

 

Last modified on Wednesday, 29 April 2009 13:15
Thursday, 25 January 2007 17:37

Project Management Plan

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The project plan is a key integrative document that uses the outputs of the other planning processes to create a consistent, coherent document that is the guide to both project execution and project control. Be familiar with what the project plan is used for and what items are often included in a project plan. The PM uses it to guide project execution, to document our planning assumptions, to document planning decisions regarding some of the alternatives that we have chosen. We use it to facilitate communication among the stakeholders and define key management reviews as to content, expense, and timing. It is a baseline for progress measurement and project control.

The project management plan can be either summary level or detailed, and can be composed of one or more subsidiary plans and other components. Each of the subsidiary plans and components is detailed to the extent required by the specific project.

The Develop Project Management Plan process includes the actions necessary to define, integrate, and coordinate all subsidiary plans into a project management plan. The project management plan content will vary depending upon the application area and complexity of the project. This process results in a project management plan that is updated and revised through the Integrated Change Control process. It also defines how the project is executed, monitored and controlled, and closed. The purpose of planning is to develop a Project Plan.


Subsidiary plans

  • Project scope management plan
  • Schedule management plan
  • Cost management plan
  • Quality management plan
  • Process improvement plan
  • Staffing management plan
  • Communication management plan
  • Risk management plan
  • Procurement management plan

Other key components include, but are not limited to:

  • Milestone list
  • Resource calendar
  • Schedule baseline
  • Cost baseline
  • Quality baseline
  • Risk register
Last modified on Tuesday, 28 April 2009 11:14

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