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Project Management Blog
Monday, 01 November 2010 10:32

How a Cup of Coffee Can Ruin Your Day

coffeeDanielle left the house with just five minutes to spare. It would have been better if she had left ten or fifteen minutes early because she wanted to stop and buy a cup of coffee. She decided that she could probably get in and out of the coffee house within seven minutes and that being just two minutes late to work was perfectly acceptable. Then Danielle drove to the coffee house.

When Danielle arrived at the coffee house the line seemed manageable. But quickly Danielle was able to see that she was going to be late. The line was moving slowly and it seemed to be because there was a new employee working the counter.  Danielle became impatient. She became agitated. She really wanted that cup of coffee and she really hated being late to work. She became angry. All kinds of angry thoughts went through her mind. “Why are they training a new employee in the middle of the rush? If it were not for this new person, I would not be late. This is so annoying.”

Published in Blogs
Monday, 18 October 2010 10:16

Use Compassion to Overcome Conflict

compassionA little compassion can go a long way.  Imagine for a moment that one of your co-workers comes into the office late and in a bad mood. You have been waiting for them because you need their input to finish writing a proposal for a customer. You walk into their office and they snap at you, “What do YOU want?”  
What do you do?

1)    Snap back at them, “I want the proposal information that you owed me thirty minutes ago and I want it right now!” You do this because they are late, they do owe you the information and their bad mood is not YOUR problem. If they can dish it out, so can you. You need them to know that you are not their door mat.

2)    Wait a moment, remember that they have been having a tough time lately and then let them know that you are here to collect their information for the customer proposal that is due this morning. You don’t yell or respond in a hostile manner. You speak to them in calm even tones. You come from a place of trying to put yourself in their shoes, remembering that they don’t want to be unhappy and neither do you.
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Monday, 10 December 2007 05:09

Should Project Managers Retire?

The question is: "Should Project Managers Retire and, if so, what is the place for our project management elders amongst the project management community?" Having reached that age when one begins to think of leaving a "legacy", I was persuaded to attend a "Philosopher's Café". This assembly was arranged by our local university to discuss the subject of "The Place of Elders in an Ever-evolving Society". In his introduction, the facilitator observed that "In traditional societies the elders were respected for their knowledge and wisdom."
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Sunday, 28 October 2007 02:32

How Male Machismo Shaped Project Management

Imagine a man dressed in black sitting next to you in the office. He looks over your shoulder, observing as you type up a report. He takes notes, nods and mumbles quietly to himself. He counts the number of keystrokes you perform per minute. You try to ignore him, but have little luck.

Published in Blogs
 Many of you have heard the old adage of “Communicate… Communicate… Communicate” as a preamble by a Project Manager at a project kickoff meeting?
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Tuesday, 21 August 2007 12:49

Project Manager/Consultant

This is an article about the interview process and a recent job seeking experience of mine. I am interested in finding out how often a scenario such as this takes place in today's environment. Is it something that just happens on occasion or does experience, age, communication skill, etc. influence the situation? Your comments are welcome.

Published in Blogs
Tuesday, 21 August 2007 06:14

Project Planning:

Every year thousands of projects are completed over budget, out of scope and past deadline.  Still, with each passing year, project managers continue to rush into projects without due diligence in defining the project and creating a plan for project execution.  By lightly addressing these critical components they are, in essence, failing their projects before any work has even commenced.  So how can project managers efficiently execute a project plan while at the same time meeting the deadlines and expectations of senior management?

 

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Bas de Baar, ProjectSociology.org

Whatever your take is on projects, at the end of the day it is just a bunch of people working together to achieve a certain goal. To laugh, cry, pull pranks, play dirty tricks and show all other kinds of behavior towards each other. If you are lucky they even work to reach the final goal. If you take everything away, and put people in the center of what a “project” is, you will see a group of stakeholders interacting with each other, just like any other group of people would do. As a Project Manager it is your goal to herd the project crowd toward the required end result.

 

Published in Blogs
Friday, 16 March 2007 14:01

How to Really Fix a Failing Project

Your project is in trouble.  You know it.  Your team knows it.  But somehow you have been able to keep it from your management.  You need a quick fix.  But there aren’t any.  What can be done to get back on track?  Since yesterday's ideas didn't help, here are some suggestions that might point you in the right direction.

Published in Blogs
Saturday, 27 January 2007 17:09

Risk Factors

One of the first inputs to risk management is the project charter. The charter is needed in risk management planning because it identifies the business need of the project and the overall product description. Risks that can prevent the project from satisfying the business need of the project must be addressed. The product description must also be evaluated to determine what risks may be preventing the project work from obtaining the acceptable product description. 

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