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Project Management Blog

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There is no doubt in my mind that you have heard the term lessons learned before.

It is mentioned extensively throughout A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, (PMBOK® Guide), I teach it as part of my Project Management Professional (PMP)® training lessons and my favorite search engine gives me over 51,000 results for the search term “lessons learned in project management”. In fact, as an experienced project manager you have probably participated or even chaired one or two lessons learned meetings yourself on your own projects.

But let’s consider the bigger picture around lessons learned. What process do we follow? What management techniques are there for lessons learned? Are all documented lessons learned equally valuable?

These questions need answers. And so I’m happy to welcome Elizabeth Harrin (www.girlsguidetopm.com -- www.linkedin.com/in/elizabethharrin/ - ) who has the answers for us!

Published in Blogs
Tuesday, 21 August 2007 15:51

Point 14 - Deming in Project Management

Total Participation Starting From the Top

This point speaks to the need for
(1) commitment from top management and
(2) commitment from everyone else in the organization.
Quality is everyone’s job, and if any implementation is not total, it will not fulfill its full potential. 

In project management, I see this point alluding to executive formation and support of a company-wide Project Management Office. That PMO must be the central source of all project management knowledge, under continuous development by the practitioners of project management. Lessons learned and any potential improvements to the project management methodology used by all PM’s in the company should be evaluated, tested, and implemented as a positive change.

Published in Blogs
Tuesday, 21 August 2007 15:49

Point 13 - Deming in Project Management

Training Not Related to Job/Task

In order for continuous improvement to become organizational culture, it must also become a personal goal for every employee. Self-improvement should not be limited to immediate application, that would be an example of short-term thinking. Employees are the most important assets of an organization, and therefore require effort to retain and enhance them.

Published in Blogs
The superhero gene inherent in project managers can mutate and become something ugly. Such is the case with Ms. Bellows. Instead of discussing, she yells. People leave her office in tears. Behind her back people call her Yelly Kelly.

The problem is that she is successful. People jump when she says to and projects get done on time. This makes upper management happy and she is rewarded, reinforcing the original problem. Eventually no one willingly works with her and some of the best resources leave the department, company or even country.

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 29 March 2007 09:48

Band-Aids and Merry-go-Rounds

As I child I had a lot of experience with both of these.  I assume everyone is familiar with band-aids, the merry-go-round I’m referring to is the kind you find on a playground.  These are basically a large dish parallel to the ground mounted on a central axis with some handle bars to hold on to - here is a picture of one.  Aside from a trip down memory lane, what do these two things have to do with managing a PMO or even project management or even work?   I’m glad you asked – both of these items and their lessons from childhood give us insight into change.  First, I want to look at each type of change and then talk about which is better (or not)?  
Published in Blogs
Saturday, 27 January 2007 17:33

Risk Monitor & Control

This is the process of identifying, analyzing, and planning for risks. The PM keeps track of the identified risks, reanalyzing of existing risks, monitoring trigger conditions for contingency plans, monitoring residual risks, and reviewing the execution of risk responses while evaluating their effectiveness. It is done by using techniques, such as variance and trend analysis, which require the use of performance data generated during project execution. Project work should be continuously monitored for new and changing risks. Other purposes of Risk Monitoring and Control are to determine if:
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